Sunday, July 31, 2011

Music Science - Psychology of Music- Musicology Read/Write Art & Science

video

Saturday, July 30, 2011

let's talk about what ur friend told u...Book References Worldwide Homeschooling, Geography of Time, Time Management













video

A Guide for Graduate Students

Negotiating Graduate School A Guide for Graduate Students 2nd Edition by Mark H. Rossman, ISBN 9780761924845

What Goes Into an ePortfolio? Adobe TV & Learning Adobe Fast

http://tv.adobe.com/search/?q=ePortfolio

http://www.donaldasher.com/ & 111 books on resumes; video

link to state employment agencies


Donald Asher author of Cool Colleges


video



Enroll In Free Resume Revolution Webinar Today





Think you can't get into a great college?
Think again!
  • Are you hyper-intelligent? Self-directed? A late-bloomer? Or just different? Then you need a great school that will challenge, nurture, inspire and motivate you—and Cool Colleges has got 'em. Fully revised since the first edition, Cool Colleges covers the most exciting schools in the U.S. and Canada, with a new chapter on eco-schools, an update on tuition-free schools and the total low-down on the so-called top-ranked schools.
You'll get the scoop on:
  • What the Ivy League is and what it really wants
  • Totally free schools, including one where financial need is a requirement for admission
  • Universities that don't give grades
  • Schools that don't want your SAT scores
  • Data on the highest (and lowest) paying majors
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  • Science and engineering schools wheree undergrads get their own labs
  • The most competititve colleges, including one that rejects 95% of applicants
  • Campuses where students love to study, even on Saturday nights
  • Schools that offer programs in computer game studies, comedy, auctioneering, special-effects makeup and more
Cool Colleges is the resource for finding your dream school—and gives you the edge you'll need to get accepted.


Are you spending all your time applying to posted job openings—postings that draw hundreds, and in some cases, thousands of applications? No matter how perfect you are for the job, there is always someone else who’s a little more qualified, more experienced. The key to success in the current job market is breaking through to the hidden job market. Over half of all jobs go to someone who did not apply to a posted opening at all. What are they doing and how are they doing it? They’re finding new jobs before the posting hits the Internet.

Career guru Donald Asher offers proven strategies for finding great opportunities in any industry. With Cracking the Hidden Job Market you’ll stop wasting time and effort and beat the job-search odds by learning how to:

• find jobs that are never posted anywhere
• get complete strangers to help you find a job
•  convince potential employers to give you an interview—even when they’re “not hiring”
• find—and land—the new jobs in this, or any, economy
Every page of Cracking the Hidden Job Market is packed with no-frills fundamentals to change the way you look for a job, this time—and forever!
Are you spending all your time applying to posted job openings—postings that draw hundreds, and in some cases, thousands of applications? No matter how perfect you are for the job, there is always someone else who’s a little more qualified, more experienced. The key to success in the current job market is breaking through to the hidden job market. Over half of all jobs go to someone who did not apply to a posted opening at all. What are they doing and how are they doing it? They’re finding new jobs before the posting hits the Internet.

Career guru Donald Asher offers proven strategies for finding great opportunities in any industry. With Cracking the Hidden Job Market you’ll stop wasting time and effort and beat the job-search odds by learning how to:

• find jobs that are never posted anywhere
• get complete strangers to help you find a job
•  convince potential employers to give you an interview—even when they’re “not hiring”
• find—and land—the new jobs in this, or any, economy
Every page of Cracking the Hidden Job Market is packed with no-frills fundamentals to change the way you look for a job, this time—and forever!
Are you spending all your time applying to posted job openings—postings that draw hundreds, and in some cases, thousands of applications? No matter how perfect you are for the job, there is always someone else who’s a little more qualified, more experienced. The key to success in the current job market is breaking through to the hidden job market. Over half of all jobs go to someone who did not apply to a posted opening at all. What are they doing and how are they doing it? They’re finding new jobs before the posting hits the Internet.

Career guru Donald Asher offers proven strategies for finding great opportunities in any industry. With Cracking the Hidden Job Market you’ll stop wasting time and effort and beat the job-search odds by learning how to:

• find jobs that are never posted anywhere
• get complete strangers to help you find a job
•  convince potential employers to give you an interview—even when they’re “not hiring”
• find—and land—the new jobs in this, or any, economy
Every page of Cracking the Hidden Job Market is packed with no-frills fundamentals to change the way you look for a job, this time—and forever!
Are you spending all your time applying to posted job openings—postings that draw hundreds, and in some cases, thousands of applications? No matter how perfect you are for the job, there is always someone else who’s a little more qualified, more experienced. The key to success in the current job market is breaking through to the hidden job market. Over half of all jobs go to someone who did not apply to a posted opening at all. What are they doing and how are they doing it? They’re finding new jobs before the posting hits the Internet.

Career guru Donald Asher offers proven strategies for finding great opportunities in any industry. With Cracking the Hidden Job Market you’ll stop wasting time and effort and beat the job-search odds by learning how to:

• find jobs that are never posted anywhere
• get complete strangers to help you find a job
•  convince potential employers to give you an interview—even when they’re “not hiring”
• find—and land—the new jobs in this, or any, economy
Every page of Cracking the Hidden Job Market is packed with no-frills fundamentals to change the way you look for a job, this time—and forever!

  • Are you spending all your time applying to posted job openings—postings that draw hundreds, and in some cases, thousands of applications? No matter how perfect you are for the job, there is always someone else who’s a little more qualified, more experienced. The key to success in the current job market is breaking through to the hidden job market. Over half of all jobs go to someone who did not apply to a posted opening at all. What are they doing and how are they doing it? They’re finding new jobs before the posting hits the Internet.
Career guru Donald Asher offers proven strategies for finding great opportunities in any industry. With Cracking the Hidden Job Market you’ll stop wasting time and effort and beat the job-search odds by learning how to:
• find jobs that are never posted anywhere
• get complete strangers to help you find a job
•  convince potential employers to give you an interview—even when they’re “not hiring”
• find—and land—the new jobs in this, or any, economy
Every page of Cracking the Hidden Job Market is packed with no-frills fundamentals to change the way you look for a job, this time—and forever!
  • Are you spending all your time applying to posted job openings—postings that draw hundreds, and in some cases, thousands of applications? No matter how perfect you are for the job, there is always someone else who’s a little more qualified, more experienced. The key to success in the current job market is breaking through to the hidden job market. Over half of all jobs go to someone who did not apply to a posted opening at all. What are they doing and how are they doing it? They’re finding new jobs before the posting hits the Internet.
Career guru Donald Asher offers proven strategies for finding great opportunities in any industry. With Cracking the Hidden Job Market you’ll stop wasting time and effort and beat the job-search odds by learning how to:
• find jobs that are never posted anywhere
• get complete strangers to help you find a job
•  convince potential employers to give you an interview—even when they’re “not hiring”
• find—and land—the new jobs in this, or any, economy
Every page of Cracking the Hidden Job Market is packed with no-frills fundamentals to change the way you look for a job, this time—and forever!


  • Stephen Colbert was a philosophy major; YouTube cofounder Chad Hurley was an art major. If you think your college major will determine your life path, think again. This streamlined edition refocuses the emphasis from job search to life launch for readers under 30 who are more attracted to achieving balanced life goals than career advancement. For those who want more than just a job, this book provides practical strategies for building a great and rewarding life

CAREER CONNECTION; FEATURE HIGHLIGHT/National Links- Military Careers & Education

http://www.christianjobs.com/job/31020/

Job Details

Video Imaging Editor

Dallas, Texas, United States


Date Posted:
7/29/2011
Job Category:
Media/Arts/Entertainment
Secondary Job Category:
 
Education:
High School
Min Pay Rate:
unspecified
Max Pay Rate:
unspecified
Job Type:
Full-Time

Classic literature for download as free eBooks;http://www.planetebook.com/

http://www.planetebook.com/

STUDY FOR YOUR4 CLEP TESTS

Browse the free eBooks for download

Chris Klicka is Senior Counsel of the Home School Legal Defense Association

Chris Klicka is Senior Counsel of the Home School Legal Defense Association, as well as Director of State and International Relations.

hslda.org

Fw: How you can earn athletic scholarships crosswalk.com/961782

http://www.crosswalk.com/family/homeschool/how-home-schoolers-can-earn-athletic-scholarships-961782.html


Home-school students have cleared many hurdles to gain academic recognition. Research reveals that home-school students score an average 20 to 30 points above the national average on standardized achievement tests. Colleges and universities across the United States have begun to open their doors to home schoolers.
Over the last several years, home schoolers have begun to earn respect in athletics. For instance, home-school graduate Jason Taylor played football for the University of Akron on a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) scholarship and later signed a contract to play with the Miami Dolphins. More recently, Kevin Johnson, a 6'7" forward, received a full basketball scholarship from the University of Tulsa, an NCAA Division I school. When the Tulsa Golden Hurricanes faced North Carolina in March 2000, Kevin became the first home schooler on record to play in the tournament known as March Madness.
During the 1998-99 academic year, the NCAA approved the academic eligibility of 49 home-school students to receive scholarships at Division I schools and 20 home-school students to receive scholarships at Division II schools. These home-school athletes went on to play college basketball, baseball, volleyball, football, wrestling, track, and virtually every sport.
Over the last several years, hundreds of home-school sports leagues have emerged throughout the states, culminating in several annual national home-school athletic tournaments. A major breakthrough for home-school athletes recently occurred in Florida when the Florida State Legislature decided to allow home-school teams to compete against public school teams.
What Steps Must a Home Schooler Take to Receive an Athletic Scholarship?
In applying for an athletic scholarship, being on top of your game is only part of the challenge. It is equally important to be on top of the academic eligibility, course standards, and core course requirements of the colleges in which you are interested -- and to do it early on. It is not uncommon for high school juniors to be contacting universities and asking these questions. By finding the
answers early in the game, you will be better equipped to ensure that your transcript reflects the necessary core course requirements.
Secondly, you need to contact the colleges in which you are interested to learn more about their specific athletic requirements for your particular sport. You should also inquire whether the college is a member of either the NCAA or the NAIA. Follow up by contacting the financial aid office and asking for the necessary paperwork to begin the eligibility determination process through one of the athletic associations. This step is absolutely essential in order to obtain an athletic scholarship.
What Exactly Is the National Collegiate Athletic Association?
Founded in 1906, the NCAA comprises approximately 964 schools, classified into three divisions. Division I has 310 schools, which tend to be the larger universities. Division II has 267 schools, which are mostly intermediate-sized colleges. Schools in both of these categories offer athletic scholarships. The 387 Division III schools do not offer athletic scholarships. The NCAA sponsors 81 championships in 22 sports. Almost 24,500 men and women student athletes annually compete for the NCAA titles.
Member colleges and universities pay the NCAA to establish and execute standards for determining an individual student's initial academic eligibility. In order to fulfill this responsibility, the NCAA has retained the ACT organization, which provides college entrance exams, to run the clearinghouse for determining a student's
academic eligibility. A student's academic eligibility will determine whether he is able to practice, compete, and receive athletic scholarships. The smaller NAIA is comprised of about 100 member universities and operates much like the NCAA.
While the scholarship money comes directly from the colleges, the national collegiate associations serve the schools to determine whether a particular student is academically eligible to receive the money from the school.
Are There Unique Requirements for the Home-school Student?

The NCAA has eagerly worked with HSLDA to establish some clear guidelines and procedures for home-school students. Home-school students must, like all other students, meet the NCAA initial eligibility standards in order to be eligible for scholarships at their university. Traditionally-schooled student athletes must be
certified by the NCAA Initial Eligibility Clearinghouse as having met the initial eligibility requirements. Home-schooled student athletes must be certified as having met the initial eligibility requirements as well, but they must go through an initial eligibility waiver process administered by the NCAA national office.
Upon contacting the NAIA, the Home School Legal Defense Association discovered that the NAIA has no specific standards for home-school students and was not aware of more than three home-schooled applicants annually.
The home-school student athlete attending an NCAA Division I or Division II school must have the institution submit an initial eligibility waiver application to the NCAA national office. The waiver application must include the following:
1. Home school transcript;
2. ACT and SAT test scores;
3. Description of the home-school teaching environment;
4. List of titles of all textbooks for home-school courses;
5. Copies of the table of content for textbooks utilized in core
courses (a sampling); and
6. Samples of work completed, such as papers by the students.
In addition, the NCAA requests a letter from the parent indicating that the home schooling was conducted in accordance with applicable state laws.
Periodically, HSLDA members run into some difficulties along the way. When such difficulties arise, HSLDA simply calls our contacts at the NCAA to clear up any problems. At the time this article was written, every home-school student who contacted us has ultimately made it through the process, making him eligible to receive athletic
scholarships at the desired institution.

With HSLDA's help, the NCAA has written Frequently Asked Questions by Home School Student Athletes. HSLDA recommends that you obtain a copy of this document from the NCAA's Web site at
http://www.ncaa.org/eligibility/cbsa/home_school.html. It is important to read this material well in advance of the time to fill out college applications, in order to make certain you will have the necessary items included in your transcript.
Approximately 100 home-school students each year successfully complete the academic eligibility process, so remember: you're not alone.
Set Your Goals
Every college student's goal should be to obtain a solid education, not to become a pro athlete. A quick look at the statistics is sobering. There are nearly 1 million high school football players and about 500,000 high school basketball players. Of those numbers, approximately 150 make it to the NFL and only about 50 make it to an
NBA team. The odds of a high school basketball player playing in the pros are 10,000 to 1. Less than three percent of college basketball seniors will play even one year in professional basketball.
Students who remain focused on academic success will be rewarded by a useful education, regardless of whether their athletic career ends at the high school, college, or professional level. If the Lord wills, some home schoolers will make it to the pros.
As Christian home schoolers, our ultimate purpose in life is to glorify God. God requires us to "seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added unto you." As we serve Him with our whole heart, soul, and mind, God will bless us. The best advice for the home-schooled, college-bound athlete is to "trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will direct your paths."
For more information, contact the following groups:
National Christian Home School Athletic Association
P.O. Box 8060
Wichita, KS 672208-8060
Phone: (316) 684-6953
Family Educators' Alliance of South Texas (FEAST)
4719 Blanco Road
San Antonio, TX 78212
Phone: (210) 342-4674
National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)
Indianapolis, IN
Phone: (317) 917-6222
http://www.ncaa.org
National Association for Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA)
Tulsa, OK
Phone: (918) 494-8828
http://www.naia.org
Chris Klicka is Senior Counsel of the Home School Legal Defense Association, as well as Director of State and International Relations. He is the author of several books, including "The Right Choice." He and his wife Tracy home school their seven children.
The Home School Legal Defense Association, established in 1985, is a nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting the right to home school in the courts, state legislatures, and the U.S. Congress. HSLDA promotes home schooling through commissioning research and working with the media, colleges, and in many other areas. To receive more information on how you can join HSLDA call 540-338-5600 or visit their Web site at www.hslda.org.



http://professionals.collegeboard.com/guidance/prepare/athletes/ncaa

Help your student-athletes stay on track

Student-athletes must complete appropriate course work in order to qualify for NCAA programs. Therefore, it's important that you and the school's coaches monitor changes in NCAA course work requirements and communicate such changes to your student-athletes.

Course work requirements for NCAA athletics and NCAA scholarships

Here is an overview of the basic NCAA eligibility criteria. Visit the NCAA Eligibility Center, the authoritative source for more details.

Wi-Fi-FreeSpots and hotspots.www.wififreespot.com

Wi-Fi-FreeSpots and hotspots.www.wififreespot.com

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance & Fundraising

https://www.cfda.gov/


1200+ Fundraising Companies: Fund Raising Ideas For Your Fundraiser!


www.fundraisingweb.org/

www.welltrainedmind.com

 

No Regrets: How Homeschooling Earned me a Master's Degree at age 16

Alexandra Swann wrote "No Regrets." She and her family have traveled and spoken extensively on the subject of home education. Alexandra Swann is the co-author of "Writing for Success", "The Fourth Kingdom" and "The Twelfth Juror." She also writes a regular blog on the consequences of excessive regulation on consumers and businesses.


Product Details

  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Alexandra Swann (April 13, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0962361100
  • ISBN-13: 978-0962361104

Alexandra is the author of "No Regrets: How Homeschooling Earned me a Master's Degree at Age Sixteen", and is co-author of "The Fourth Kingdom," and "The Twelfth Juror,". She also writes a regular blog on the subject of financial reform which can be read at www.frontier2000.net or www.protectionmoney.blogspot.com.

The Value of Uniqueness vs. Orthodoxy ... article

Home Education Magazine
March-April 1998 - Articles
Fly-Fishing to College
The Value of Uniqueness vs. Orthodoxy
Alison McKee

http://homeedmag.com/HEM/152/152.98_art_fly.clg.php

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:66l9ekyzoQ0J:www.homeedmag.com/HEM/152/152.98_art_fly.clg.html+fly+fishing+and+homeschool&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&source=www.google.com

"GED vs. the personalized diploma."
...
As I had always suspected, taking the GED was a guarantee of nothing. In fact, a story came to me of a young man who had been advised by a university admissions counselor to take the GED before sending in his application. When the young man finally took the exam and submitted his score (which was a good one) along with his application for admissions, he was told, "We don't accept students who have taken the GED." He got nowhere with his appeals...
The GED seemed to be a test which, when passed, signified only basic literacy in general schoolish subjects. ..

www.hslda.org/.../Government_Homeschool_Proclamations-Federal...

www.hslda.org/.../Government_Homeschool_Proclamations-Federal...

CHEA.ORG/Credit Banks Who Is CHEA? CHEA-CIQG Logo 20th Year A national advocate and institutional voice for promoting academic quality through accreditation, CHEA is an association of 3,000 degree-granting colleges and universities and recognizes approximately 60 institutional and programmatic accrediting organizations

The Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) has produced four short videos posted on YouTube. They address:
http://www2.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/naciqi.html


Q. Does the Department of Education accredit any postsecondary institutions or programs?
No, the Department of Education does not accredit any postsecondary institutions or programs. However, the U.S. Secretary of Education (Secretary) is required by law to publish a list of nationally recognized accrediting agenciesthat the Secretary determines to be reliable authorities as to the quality of education or training provided by the institutions of higher education and the higher education programs they accredit. The Secretary also recognizes State agencies for the approval of public postsecondary vocational education and nurse education.
Q. May the U.S. Department of Education interfere with an institution’s decision concerning a student or faculty matter?
A. No, The Department of Education’s Organization Act does not permit the Department to have any control over an institution’s academic, student, or personnel administration. Section 103(b) of that Act reads:
"No provision of a program administered by the Secretary or by any other officer of the Department shall be construed to authorize the Secretary or any other such officer to exercise any direction, supervision of control over the curriculum, program of instruction, administration, or personnel of any educational institution, school, or school system, over any accrediting agency or association, or over the selection or content of library resources, textbooks, or other instructional materials by any educational institution or schools system, except to the extent authorized by law."
Q. How do I file a complaint about a school or accrediting body?
A. Matters concerning disputes between a student and a faculty member or an administrator over such issues as billing, grading, financial aid, or employment is considered an individual dispute between the parties at an institution. Such disputes are best resolved by the parties involved, through an institution’s Ombudsman, or through the legal system.
Contact an institution’s accrediting body if there is evidence that appears to support the institution’s non-compliance with one or more of its accrediting body’s standards. Clearly identify the standard and how the institution allegedly does not comply. Accrediting agencies should not be contacted in regard to admission information or issues involving application of an institution’s academic policies.


What’s the difference between regional vs. national accreditation?

This gets a bit complicated. The U.S. Department of Education says: “The U.S. Department of Education does not have the authority to accredit private or public elementary or secondary schools, and the Department does not recognize accrediting bodies for the accreditation of private or public elementary and secondary schools. However, the U.S. Department of Education does recognize accrediting bodies for the accreditation of institutions of higher (postsecondary) education.”
Translation: The U.S. Department of Education doesn’t accredit schools directly. It does, however, recognize organizations that provide accreditation to individual schools. And it gets even more complicated, because there are lots of different USDE-approved accrediting agencies. Some are regional, while others accredit specific types of schools. Here’s a partial list.

Accreditation bodies with nationwide reach . . .

  • Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools – Web address: www.abhes.org
  • Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges - Web address: www.accsc.org
  • Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training - Web address: www.accet.org
  • Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training – Web address: www.acics.org
  • Council on Occupational Education –Web address: www.council.org
  • Distance Education and Training Council - Web address: www.detc.org

Regional college accrediting bodies (partial list) . . .

  • Middle States Commission on Higher Education (DE, DC, MD, NJ, NY, PA, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) - Web address: www.msche.org
  • New England Association of Schools and Colleges (CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT) - Web address: www.neasc.org
  • North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, (AZ, MI, MN, MO, NE, NM, ND, OH, OK, SD, WV, WI, WY) - Web address: www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org
  • Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (AL, ID, MT, NV, OR, UT, WA) – Web address: www.nwccu.org
  • Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (AL, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, TX, VA) - Web address: www.sacscoc.org
(http://www.straighterline.com/online-education-resources/how-to-make-sure-your-credits-and-your-degree-count)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educational_specialist

Chat with student Advisor or Education Specialists
here's one source

https://server.iad.liveperson.net/hc/38311917/?cmd=file&file=visitorWantsToChat&site=38311917

video
The videos provide helpful information to anyone with an interest in knowing more about accreditation. Each directs viewers to the CHEA Website for more in-depth information.




Council for Higher
Education Accreditation

One Dupont Circle NW
Suite 510
Washington, DC 20036
(tel) 202-955-6126
(fax) 202-955-6129
chea@chea.org


CREDIT BANKS

Instant Transcripts from a Credit Bank

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Thomas Edison State College
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Charter Oak State College
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E-mail: info@charteroak.edu




APPLYING CREDITS/TRANSFER CREDIT/TRANSCRIPTS

EXAMPLE INDIANA UNIVERSITY
Self-Acquired Competency Credit
As a student in the General Studies Degree program, you may be able to earn academic credits for professional experiences. These self-aquired competency (SAC) credits are awarded based on documentation you provide.
In general, self-acquired competency credit is awarded based on the following guidelines:
  • You must be admitted to the School of Continuing Studies, have completed 12 credit hours at Indiana University subsequent to admission, and be in good academic standing before we can evaluate credit for self-acquired competency.
  • You can apply a maximum of 30 credit hours toward the B.G.S.
  • If you plan to seek SAC credits, you must consult with your general studies academic advisor as early as possible. SAC credit must be carefully integrated with your total degree plan.
  • Learning must parallel courses in the Indiana University curriculum in order to be recognized as specific-course credit. Learning of college-level caliber that cannot be equated to specific course content might be awarded as general-elective credit.
  • The general studies director or advisor arranges to have your SAC portfolio assessed by faculty of the appropriate school or department.
  • The fee you will be charged per credit hour for SAC credit is generally the per-credit-hour fee charged for undergraduate Independent Study Program courses at the time the SAC credit is transcribed to your official student record.
Read more about self-acquired competency credits - including a list of steps you will need to take in order to complete a SAC portfolio


http://www.chea.org/pdf/RecognitionWellman_Jan1998.pdf


Recognition vs. Accreditation
Recognition of accreditation agencies is often thought of as equivalent of accreditation of institutions,
the difference being that agencies are “recognized” while institutions are accredited. Yet the two are quite
distinct, despite similarities in vocabulary and process.
Accreditation is a nongovernmental peer process designed both to assure minimum standards and to
help institutions assess and improve themselves. All accrediting of U.S. higher education institutions is
done by nongovernmental accreditors. Institutions that are not accredited by ED- recognized accreditation associations may not receive public funds. Accreditation also is used for state oversight purposes,
both as a substitute for state review of accredited institutions’ quality (in some states) and in relation to
professional school licensing examinations. Institutions themselves use accreditation status as a means of
determining whether credits students have earned elsewhere will be accepted for admissions or transfer
purposes. (Accreditation is not the sole criterion for such determinations, but it typically does play a
role.) Finally, being accredited has public value and benefit; it confirms to parents, students, and employers that the institution meets minimum educational standards.
As stated earlier, recognition is both governmental and nongovernmental. Governmental recognition is a regulatory process conducted by the U.S. Department of Education on behalf of the Secretary
of Education. The federal regulatory process is directed primarily toward ensuring that associations meet
minimum standards for structure, governance, procedures, and academic standards. The benefits of recognition are real: associations that fail the federal process are not eligible to be “gatekeepers” for student
financial aid or other federal funding.
Nongovernmental recognition, on the other hand, is a review process for membership in a private
organization. It is a form of self-regulation, through the development and promotion of community

standards of best practice in accrediting associations, enforced through the review of application for
membership. As a form of self-regulation, the “sanction” for an association that does not meet recognition standards is loss of membership in the organization. The meaning of nongovernmental recognition is
somewhat obscure; there is no easy way for the public to tell whether an association without recognition
failed to meet the standard or simply chose not to apply for recognition. Thus, nongovernmental recognition is much less prescriptive than federal recognition; it is oriented more toward improvement than to
assurance of meeting minimum standards.
The public demands considerable information about recognition status. Knowing that an institution is accredited by an association recognized by ED or COPA/CORPA helps ensure that standards of
quality assessment and control are in place. Unfortunately, the ambiguity of “recognition” compromises
the effectiveness of the consumer information role because the public typically cannot distinguish between agencies that are “approved” (ED) or “recognized” (COPA/CORPA) and those that claim to be
“licensed” or “certified” by a fictitious entity.
Analysis of the range of options for the future role of accreditation recognition should be grounded
in a thorough understanding of the current structure and of how the governmental and nongovernmental
process are organized. A brief history of the evolution of those two processes and a synopsis of the major
differences between them follow.


...

No comprehensive mandatory
system covers all accreditors.
(3) Not all things required by the public must be performed by government. For example, a private
entity can obtain information about and publish an institution’s accreditation status.
(4) The template set in current federal law, with the Department of Education as the primary regulator of accreditation, is not inviolate. The Higher Education Act is reauthorized periodically, and
amendments to it are possible. Also, it is not self-evident that all things that might be regulated
by government must be regulated by government, or within the federal government by the Department of Education. A clear demarcation within government of the roles and responsibilities
of the states and the federal government on one hand, and of federal agencies on the other, would
seem to be preferable to the current cobbled system.
 The Higher Education Act is being amended in 1998, and CHEA and others have requested
amendments that would improve the accreditation section of the law by clarifying roles and responsibilities and by limiting federal authority over academic standards. A fundamental recasting
of the recognition role, including a possible shifting of oversight away from ED or to a system
that relies explicitly on a public/private partnership, is not requested at this time. Through such a
shift is unlikely, it should be discussed....


Experiential Learning/How TECEP® Exams Work


http://tesc.edu/4868.php
TECEP fees have been reduced to $99 per test for both enrolled and nonenrolled students.
The Thomas Edison State College Examination Program (TECEP®) was designed especially with the adult learner in mind, and has enabled students to earn college credit without taking formal courses for more than 35 years.

How TECEP® Exams Work
One way to demonstrate your college-level knowledge is to prepare for and pass a test. Students select a test in a subject area in which they have prior knowledge or experience. Then, they prepare for the test using a test description, and register to take the test when they are ready. Once you pass the exam, you receive college credit. TECEP® exams are designed for highly independent learners who have the ability to study in a student-centered environment with no time constraints, no assignments, and no mentor interaction.

Preparing for Your TECEP®

You can view a list of TECEP® exams and print the test description for each one. Browse our TECEP® tests.

A test description includes a list of exam topics, suggested study materials and sample questions. By reviewing the test description material you'll know how to prepare for the exam. You'll study at your own pace and schedule your own test date at a convenient location. If something unexpected comes up, you can reschedule your test date. 

Learn more about preparing for a TECEP®.

You may have developed college-level skills and knowledge through your
past work, training, volunteering, adult education courses, hobbies, inservice
work or other experiences. The PLA program can enable you to
demonstrate this knowledge and earn credit for it. Because you will be
demonstrating the college-level knowledge you have already acquired,
usually no book purchase is required. Course objectives and a schedule
of assignment due dates, which will guide you in the development of your
narrative, will be available for you to view at the beginning of the term. The
course mentor will also assist you in determining what additional
evidence is required.

All TECEP® Tests


TECEP fees have been reduced to $99 per test for both enrolled and nonenrolled students.

Select a test to view the test description.

English Composition
English Composition I (ENC-101-TE)
English Composition II (ENC-102-TE)
Humanities
Public Relations Thought & Practice (COM-210-TE)
Technical Writing (ENG-201-TE)
Introduction to News Reporting (JOU-110-TE)
Social Sciences
Introduction to Political Science (POS-101-TE)
Psychology of Women (PSY-270-TE)
Marriage and the Family (SOC-210-TE)
Natural Sciences/Mathematics
The Science of Nutrition (BIO-208-TE)
Business and Management
Federal Income Taxation (ACC-421-TE)
Business in Society (BUS-311-TE)
Business Policy (BUS-421-TE)
Security Analysis and Portfolio Management (FIN-321-TE)
Financial Institutions and Markets (FIN-331-TE)
Marketing Communications (MAR-321-TE)
Sales Management (MAR-322-TE)
Advertising (MAR-323-TE)
Operations Management (OPM-301-TE)
Human Services
Kinesiology (FIT-211-TE)
Introduction to Human Services (HUS-101-TE)
Computer Science Technology
Network Technology (CMP-354-TE)

As Defined: Educational Specialist

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educational_specialist


The Education Specialist, also referred to as Educational Specialist, Specialist in Education, or Ed.S., is an advanced academic degree in the U.S. that is designed for individuals who wish to develop additional skills or increase their knowledge beyond the master's degree level, but may not wish to pursue a degree at the doctoral level.

The Ed.S. degree is a focused degree program that is considered by accrediting bodies as the completion of the sixth year of collegiate study,(between the master's and doctorate), assuming a master's degree in education. Programs typically require from 30 to 45 semester hours beyond a master's degree, but may be as high as 65. Many also require an oral defense of a scholarly thesis or field study, similar to a dissertation at the culmination of the degree. While master's degree holders can usually be confident of advancement and upward movement on the salary scale, the Ed.S. degree holder may find that managers are often not aware of, or do not have a way of recognizing, this lesser-known degree, although some post-secondary faculty union contracts in the U.S. recognize the Ed.S. as equivalent to a doctorate on their salary scales. Some Ed.S. degree holders were on their path to earn the Ph.D, but may have stopped short of completion due to some unforeseen contingencies. Some Ed.S. programs function as a bridge between a master's degree and a doctorate via articulation agreements.
The Specialist in School Psychology (SSP) degree is similar to the Ed.S. in School Psychology. It is typically granted when the program is located in a department of psychology rather than education.
Some universities may use an abbreviation other than Ed.S. to indicate completion of this degree. At Arkansas State University, for example, students may earn an S.C.C.T. (Specialist in Community College Teaching).


Education Specialist (Ed.S.) in Teaching and Learning

The Education Specialist in Teaching and Learning program is designed to provide a high level of professional proficiency skills as well as research skills which are emphasized throughout the program course work. The role of the classroom teacher is expanded to that of teacher/research which allows the Education Specialist candidate to become a more active participant and critical consumer of educational research. The Ed.S. in Teaching and Learning curriculum is based on an inquiry approach that emphasizes reflective,  problem-solving skills applicable to a multitude of education problems, pedagogy, and issues.

http://www.collegeboard.org/

http://www.collegeboard.org/

Support Groups http://www.degree.net/

http://www.degree.net/

THE COUNCIL OF HIGHER EDUCATION

video

Office of Postsecondary Education - Home Page

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ope/index.html?src=rt

U.S. Department of Education
Office of Postsecondary Education
1990 K Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20006

TYPES oF ACCREDITATION

video

LINKS TO ARTICLES REGARDING CREDIT TRANSFER AND GOVERNMENT HOMESCHOOL TITLE VI PROGRAMS

www.detc.org/.../Don't%20Take%20No%20for%20an%20Answer.pdf
Don't TakeNo” for an Answer When Trying to Transfer Your Credits or Degree. November 2008.



http://www.exploringhomeschooling.com/GovernmentHomeschooling.aspx

Reasons to Avoid
Government Homeschooling Like the Plague
and Why Believers Need to Create Christ-
Centered, Private Homeschools



Family Businesses

HOME BUSINESSES
Looking for a good deal?
These home school families sell books and supplies at great prices.
Support family businesses!
Listings supplied by our readers; we don’t personally vouch for these.
If you experience any difficulty with any business we’ve listed, please notify the webmaster!
Alpha Textbooks offers resources for students or for entire schools. Shipping throughout Canada!
American Home-School Publishing offers a wonderful catalog of history, Latin, Greek, and reading resources.
Beloved Books offers used “living books” and “life-building audio resources.”
Best Homeschool Buys connects homeschooling families to an organized listing of current homeschool curricula available for purchase on eBay. Also, many homeschool curricula sales are announced on our blog.
Bookpeddler offers a wide variety of homeschool resources: Charlotte Mason, Saxon, Greenleaf, and more.
Bright Ideas Press offers resources for science, history, and geography.
Builder Books, owned by Bob & Patty Alberg, has been evaluating and selling home school materials since 1983. They ship by mail order, Internet and also have a store in Lynnwood, Washington.
By Way of the Family, in St. Paul, offers discounted curricula for home schoolers.
Castle Heights Press offers science books, lab manuals, unit studies, and other eclectic titles. You can also check out their blog here.
Catholic Science currently offers classes in Biology, Chemistry, and a summer course in Astronomy online.
Children’s Books in South Carolina offers great discounts. Visit their website for a catalog and information, but order by phone.
Chinaberry carries a fascinating selection of books, story tapes, games, puzzles, and “treasures.”
Classical Home Education offers a diverse collection of quality homeschooling products from a wide array of publishers.
Copycat Books offers e-books with copywork models in manuscript and cursive available in Tradition, Modern, and Italic handwriting styles.
Curriculum Connection offers “homeschool supplies at discount prices.”
Discount Home-School Supplies offers deep discounts on supplies and books as well as on popular curricula (Alpha Omega, Saxon, etc.)
The Elijah Company has been in business for twelve years; visit the website to order a catalog from this highly-regarded family bookseller.
Exodus Books in Oregon City, Oregon is run by a home school graduate!
Geography Matters offers ideas, projects, and supplies for teaching geography.
The Hedge School: Curricula and books for Catholic parents who home school and afterschool, along with diagramming
resources for everyone.
Homeschoolmaster.org sells homeschooling supplies including microscopes, dissection materials, and labware.
Homeschool Classifieds has hundreds of listings from individuals wanting to buy or sell curriculum.  Listings are free, instantly posted, arranged by title and category, and kept up-to-date.  The site also carries used biographies, histories, and devotional books (with cover scans) at great prices.
Homeschool Library Builder offers new and used living books at bargain prices, including selections recommended by your favorite curricula, children’s books useful for unit studies, and titles providing spiritual edification for Christian homeschoolers.
Home4School Gear offers many of the items recommended in The Well-Trained Mind.
Home School Emporium, from the Leggewie Family, includes many resources and specializes in historical fiction by G.A. Henty.
Home School Loft,  has “tons of new and slightly used homeschool books that are at incredible prices” and get new shipments every Tuesday. “We hope to serve you all the way on your homeschooling journey straight into college!”
Home Training Tools sells science curriculum, supplies, kits, books, etc., at good prices. They have everything from microscopes down to lab items under a dollar. For the various science curricula they sell, they offer pre-assembled packages of needed lab supplies.
The Inklings Bookshop, in Lynchburg, Virginia carries resources for classical Christian education and takes online orders.  You can find them at 1206 Main St., Lynchburg, VA 24504, phone 434-845-2665.
Jonathan’s Journey, written and sold by Katherine Bell, gives a “big picture” survey of the Bible.
Judaica for Kids (“Cool Stuff for Jewish Kids”) offers educational materials and books as well as toys, games, and other items.
King David’s Harp offers resources for the study of ancient music.
Kunker Hill Publications provides the Keepers at Home household organizer for busy moms.
Lamp Post Homeschool Store offers home school curriculum, resources, and supplies with a Christian perspective.  Purchase curriculum online or at our store in north central Pennsylvania. Owned and operated by Wynne and Harriet Yoder who homeschool their children through high school.
Lifetime Books and Gifts is the Farewell family business; they offer a wide variety of books, including many in the classical curriculum.
Sandi Strenkowski’s Living Learning Books is a science curriculum-activity guide based on Well-Trained Mind recommendations.
MainStreet Bookends is a Warner, NH bookstore and art gallery that supports local artists and authors as well as offering books, toys, games, art supplies, and more.  It’s run by the homeschooling Nevins family.
Memoria Press, founded by the author of Latina Christiana, publishes several courses in Latin, logic, rhetoric, and classical studies.
Miami Phillips offers “Project Coaching for You and Your Business.” E-mail coach@miamiphillips.com, or call (404) 597-6000 (Dallas, Georgia); a free newsletter is available by e-mailing WeeklyWisdoms-subscribe@topica.email-publisher.com
Nothing New Press is Christine Miller’s family business, publishing texts for classical Christian homeschoolers.
Paidea Classics is an Orthodox publishing company that publishes “literature from the past” for home schooling families –
their website has free texts for downloading as well.
Peace Hill Press publishes history and language resources for classical educators.
Pfeiffer House Music offers homeschool music curricula for Kindergarten through Fourth Grade.
The Phunny Farm offers free unit studies for home school families: music history units, supplementary units to the Beautiful Feet Holling C. Holling study science units, and more coming soon.
Queen Homeschool Supplies specializes in Living Books for all ages in all subjects, Nature Journals & Notebooks, Literature-based Unit Study Guides, Games, and products that reflect a Charlotte Mason style of learning.
Rainbow Resource Center, run by Bob and Linda Schneider, offers lots of WTM-recommended resources (and much more) at a discount.
R.O.C.K Solid, Inc. is a Christian supplier of both books and home school supplies.
Schola Latina offers Latin curricula, focusing on introductory-level texts.
Shaklee/AirSource products are sold by home school mom Shelly Phillips “Vitamins & supplements AirSource 3000 – the natural way to stop allergies, asthma and molds!”
shelly@healthytouch.info
Shekinah Curriculum Cellar has a huge selection of books and supplies and features same-day shipping for orders placed before 3 PM.
Timberdoodle has great science, art, history, sewing and sign language resources (and more).
Tree of Life School specializes in classical education; offers classical texts as well as the option of a personalized classical program for your family.
Usborne Books & More as well as Kane-Miller-   EDC Educational Services makes educational, interactive, lavishly illustrated books available to homeschool families. They incorporate activities and puzzles to challenge a child’s observation and intelligence. Their superb printing quality and exceptionally well-produced graphics, high ratio of pictures to text, short magazine-like format and unique detail set Usborne/Kane-Miller apart from anything yet produced. There is a wide range of subjects covering hobbies, history, science, nature, foreign language, parent’s guides and more. Usborne Books truly appeal to all ages, infants to adults, with prices to suit everyone.
Valerie’s Living Books is a resource for those looking for older and out-of-print books.  Valerie also has her own list of home school booksellers.
Veritas Press, the Detweiler family business, offers classical materials for home and school.
Yes Kidz Can!, a site that offers resources for parents who want to teach kids about the importance of giving, for the giving child, and much more.